NEWS

Winners announced for McClelland Awards Exhibitions

 

The Rick Amor Drawing, Splash Watercolour and Senini Awards

David Fenoglio, ‘Material landscape’ 2021, winner of the Rick Amor Drawing Award 2021

McClelland is delighted to announce the winners of the three major drawing, watercolour and ceramics Awards which are currently on exhibition in the gallery until 6 February 2022.

The Rick Amor Drawing Award 2021 goes to David Fenoglio for his drawing ‘Material Landscape’ 2021.

The $20,000 prize was judged by renowned Australian artist John Wolseley, with the winning work chosen from seventeen works shortlisted by artists Rick Amor and Paul Boston, with McClelland’s Director Lisa Byrne.

Rick Amor Drawing Award judge John Wolseley described Material landscape by David Fenoglio as a powerful and beautiful drawing with skillful and evocative use of the charcoal medium. “This drawing of creased and folded cloth resting on a table evoking a mountain landscape reminds me of some of the theories of the geographer Jay Appleton in his book The Experience of Landscape. Appleton suggests that ‘prospect, refuge and hazard’ are the three main responses which those walking over the land often experience. We are pulled up to the tops of hill where we can scan the valley below for potential enemies, or we are attracted to caves or enclosed spaces where we can seek refuge, or we can be attracted to rocky or wild bits of country in some kind of romantic sublime urge towards danger. I see all these qualities in this poetic and expressive drawing,” Mr Wolseley said.

 

The Splash Contemporary Watercolour Award has been won by three artists:
Andrew Seward, Gregory Prior, and Joseph Anatolius.

Twenty-eight works were selected for the exhibition by a panel comprising Lisa Byrne, Director, McClelland; John Young; Artist and Trustee, McClelland; Lisa Waup, Artist; and Simon Lawrie, Curator, McClelland.

Three acquisitive awards of $10,000 for original works in watercolour were judged by Kirsty Grant, Freelance Curator and Writer; Melissa Keys, Senior Curator, Heide Museum of Modern Art; and Sim Luttin, Curator and Gallery Manager, Arts Project Australia.

Andrew Seward, ‘Mulberry, summer’ 2016

Splash Award judge, Kirsty Grant, said the winning works reflected a diversity of approaches to the medium that was very exciting to see.

“The three works utilise the particular qualities of watercolour to express ideas. “Andrew Seward’s Mulberry, Summer, a leporello, or concertina artist book, that extends to two and a half meters when fully opened, is based on his observation of a mulberry tree.

Eschewing the traditional elements of observational drawing, such as line, tone and scale, this work becomes a joyous meditation on colour, inherently abstract and yet rich with symbolic associations.

Success Hill (Repair) by Gregory Pryor focuses on an area of Whadjuk Booja, a section of the Swan River (Derbal Yerrigan) near Bassendean in Perth. While it depicts a recognisable landscape subject, it is moody and mysterious. Using the fluid, unpredictable nature of watercolour, the work draws the viewer in, ultimately asking more questions than it provides answers.

Work #3 (Arrangement) by Joseph Anatolius stood out for its graphic precision and meticulous draughtsmanship. Without colour or extraneous detail, it focuses our attention on the objects depicted which are familiar, and yet in this context, also somewhat surreal,” Ms Grant said.

Joseph Anatolius, ‘Work #3 (Arrangement)’ 2020, watercolour, graphite pigment and water 46.0 x 32.5 cm. Courtesy the artist.

Gregory Pryor, ‘Success Hill (Repair)’ 2021, Photo courtesy of the artist.

The Mary & Lou Senini Student Art Award – Ceramics goes to Saskia Muecke for her work Untitled #2: Studies in nature series 2021.

The $3,000 Award is presented annually to a Victorian tertiary art student who, in the opinion of the selection panel, is of outstanding ability and promise. The Award was judged by McClelland’s Director, Lisa Byrne and Curator, Simon Lawrie.

Saskia Muecke, Untitled #2: Studies in nature series 2021, porcelain, wire armature, natural beach sands, 21.0 x 18.5 x 10.5 cm. Photo Mitch Pelns Ross.

McClelland launches range of

Limited Edition Small Sculptures

Clive Murray-White, Assisted Suiseki 2021, patinated bronze, steel, timber, 22.5 x 13.5 x 13.5 cm. Copyright the artist. Photo Mitch Pelns-Ross.

Narelle White, Gentle Kin 2021, sand, clay, rock, 24.0 x 34.0 cm. Copyright the artist. Photo Mitch Pelns-Ross.

Manon Van Kouswijk, Beads for Buildings 2021, aluminium, sterling silver, beads, automotive paint, steel pins, 28.0 x 23.0 x 6.0 cm. Copyright the artist. Photo Mitch Pelns-Ross.

Vipoo Srivilasa, Little People 2021, polished bronze, two works: (left) 15.0 x 13.0 x 7.0 cm; (right) 16.0 x 24.0 x 7.0 cm. Copyright the artist. Image courtesy the artist.

November 22, 2021

McClelland has commissioned a series of Limited Edition Small Sculptures by leading Australian sculptors, Vipoo Srivilasa, Clive Murray-White, Narelle White and Manon van Kouswijk.

The works, which are for sale, were commissioned by McClelland as an initiative initiative to provide financial support for artists who have struggled with the economic burdens of the COVID-19 restrictions.  It follows an earlier initiative to support artists in troubled times, the McClelland National Small Sculpture Awards 2020, for domestic scale works.

McClelland Director, Lisa Byrne, said there was strong public interest in the Small Sculpture Awards last year, with many of the works available for sale and all proceeds from sales going to the artists.

“The Limited Edition Small Sculpture project allows McClelland to offer for sale domestic scale sculptures at affordable prices, which are keenly sought after.

“It’s a great way to spread the joy of having beautiful artworks in the home while providing direct financial benefit to artists who have been hit hard by lockdowns,” Ms Byrne said.

The works for sale are all under 50cm in height, in limited editions ranging from 3 to 6, and prices from $1,200 to $6,400.

Vipoo Srivilasa’s work “Little People” 2021, features bronze with gold patina figurines, made during lockdown.

“I made these little people during the lockdown period to keep me company and fight the feeling of isolation and loneliness.

“Making Little People provided me with positive energy and happy activities to keep my mind away from the uncertain future. They represent many of my friends who I would love to catchup over a nice meal and do some art gossiping,” said Mr Srivilasa.

Narelle White’s work “Gentle Kin” 2021, features figures made from sand, clay and rock.

“With an amalgam of biomorphic and geologic references, my figures appear to emerge from a fictional landscape.

“I think of these figures as visitors who invite us to see ourselves in the material stuff of this world, and who invoke an ethic of recognition and empathy. Which is to say, I am using ceramic process to rethink our relationship with matter – and that a curiosity for material agency informs each aspect of my work.

Manon van Kouswijk’s work, “Beads for Buildings” 2021, is made from aluminum, sterling silver beads, automotive paint, and steel pins.

Beads for Buildings is a sculptural work that operates in the space between the wall it is mounted on and the viewer who stands in front of it or walks past.

“As an artist practising within the field of contemporary jewellery I am interested in the way these intimate objects perform in a public as well as a domestic context. When making exhibitions I work with the architecture of the space to establish connections between the space, the body (the viewer) and the jewellery object,” Ms van Kouswijk said.

Clive Murray White’s Assisted Suiseki” 2021, inspired by 26,000,000-year-old piece of marbleised North Queensland coral reef, encrusted naturally with crystals, but is the edition is cast bronze with patinated effect to reimagine an ancient surface.

The artist’s family comes from Far East Asia and he was surrounded by artefacts primarily from Japan and China. Western trained, he realised that art concepts claimed as Western had ongoing 1000-year-old Chinese/Japanese precedents, none more important than Gongshi and Suiseki, both meaning Scholar Rocks or “readymades”. For this edition the artist chose his “Suiseki No: 1” (essentially an altered marble Scholar Rock) to be cast in bronze, it is intentional that viewers find their own meaning in the work, be it damaged Western antiquity or through pareidolia.

A second round of McClelland editions by Ronnie van Hout, Lisa Waup, Dominic White and Beverly Meldrum are being produced to be available before the end of the year to complement the full offering.

The works are now officially launched and available by contacting Jacqui Harris, Front of House at McClelland Sculpture Park+Gallery by email jharris@mcclellandgallery.com or by phone +61 3 97891671

The McClelland Editions are supported by Creative Victoria through the Strategic Investment Fund 2.

Four x Four @McClelland

 


Image: Judith Wright Carnivale: Second Stage (11), 2021,acrylic on Japanese paper, 100 x 100cm. Courtesy of the artist and Sophie Gannon Gallery.

In support of the local art industry which been doing it tough through the COVID lockdown, McClelland has developed a quick response initiative with some commercial galleries and their artists.

 

Wednesday 27 October, 2021

Four x Four @ McClelland is a 3-day special project exhibition with four galleries presenting four Victorian-based artists in the Sarah & Baillieu Myer Education Pavilion, an extensive space at McClelland which cannot currently be used for education programs due to restrictions.

The participating galleries are: Sophie Gannon Gallery, THIS IS NO FANTASY, Daine Singer and MARS Gallery.

The artists represented are: Sophia Hewson, Jenna Lee, Penelope Davis, Meagan Streader, Celia Gullett, Fiona McMonagle, Judith Wright, Ember Fairbairn, Kirsty Budge, Benjamin Prabowo Sexton, Kate Tucker, Matt Arbuckle, Juan Ford, Petrina Hicks, Michael Cook and Victoria Reichelt.

McClelland Director, Lisa Byrne, describes Four x Four @ McClelland as an opportunity to support artists whose projects were cancelled, whose work never saw the light of day, and who incurred costs for fairs and events which didn’t happen.

“Covid has engendered a spirit of collegiality amongst many gallerists and the public sector, not previously apparent, with numerous calls offering cooperative support. For those who’ve missed out or whose exhibition was hung but the gallery doors didn’t open – this initiative is designed to support art for Xmas in 2021. The initiative is designed to encourage collectors and art audiences to consider new ways of engaging with art and supporting each other. Whilst we can only work with four gallerists this year, we look to upon success include more galleries ahead. Artists need our support and encouragement at this incredibly demanding time and in the months ahead as the entire arts ecology in Victoria and nationally recovers and looks to new modes of activation that are sustainable and demonstrate a responsible use of resources. McClelland is delighted to be partnering on this concept that supports our key stakeholder group, artists. Come to McClelland to experience this unique re-awakening of our shared artistic life and help celebrate our commitment to Art with Nature,”

– Director Lisa Byrne

Special Hours of opening for Four x Four @ McClelland will be – 11:00am to 5:00pm, from Friday 10 December through to Sunday 12 December with outdoor refreshments, seating and bookable Café Dining available throughout the weekend.

 

McClelland launches range of

Limited Edition Small Sculptures

 

 

November 22, 2021

McClelland has commissioned a series of Limited Edition Small Sculptures by leading Australian sculptors, Vipoo Srivilasa, Clive Murray-White, Narelle White and Manon van Kouswijk.

The works, which are for sale, were commissioned by McClelland as an initiative initiative to provide financial support for artists who have struggled with the economic burdens of the COVID-19 restrictions.  It follows an earlier initiative to support artists in troubled times, the McClelland National Small Sculpture Awards 2020, for domestic scale works.

McClelland Director, Lisa Byrne, said there was strong public interest in the Small Sculpture Awards last year, with many of the works available for sale and all proceeds from sales going to the artists.

“The Limited Edition Small Sculpture project allows McClelland to offer for sale domestic scale sculptures at affordable prices, which are keenly sought after.

“It’s a great way to spread the joy of having beautiful artworks in the home while providing direct financial benefit to artists who have been hit hard by lockdowns,” Ms Byrne said.

The works for sale are all under 50cm in height, in limited editions ranging from 3 to 6, and prices from $1,200 to $6,400.

Vipoo Srivilasa’s work “Little People” 2021, features bronze with gold patina figurines, made during lockdown.

“I made these little people during the lockdown period to keep me company and fight the feeling of isolation and loneliness.

“Making Little People provided me with positive energy and happy activities to keep my mind away from the uncertain future. They represent many of my friends who I would love to catchup over a nice meal and do some art gossiping,” said Mr Srivilasa.

Narelle White’s work “Gentle Kin” 2021, features figures made from sand, clay and rock.

“With an amalgam of biomorphic and geologic references, my figures appear to emerge from a fictional landscape.

“I think of these figures as visitors who invite us to see ourselves in the material stuff of this world, and who invoke an ethic of recognition and empathy. Which is to say, I am using ceramic process to rethink our relationship with matter – and that a curiosity for material agency informs each aspect of my work.

Manon van Kouswijk’s work, “Beads for Buildings” 2021, is made from aluminum, sterling silver beads, automotive paint, and steel pins.

Beads for Buildings is a sculptural work that operates in the space between the wall it is mounted on and the viewer who stands in front of it or walks past.

“As an artist practising within the field of contemporary jewellery I am interested in the way these intimate objects perform in a public as well as a domestic context. When making exhibitions I work with the architecture of the space to establish connections between the space, the body (the viewer) and the jewellery object,” Ms van Kouswijk said.

Clive Murray White’s Assisted Suiseki” 2021, inspired by 26,000,000-year-old piece of marbleised North Queensland coral reef, encrusted naturally with crystals, but is the edition is cast bronze with patinated effect to reimagine an ancient surface.

The artist’s family comes from Far East Asia and he was surrounded by artefacts primarily from Japan and China. Western trained, he realised that art concepts claimed as Western had ongoing 1000-year-old Chinese/Japanese precedents, none more important than Gongshi and Suiseki, both meaning Scholar Rocks or “readymades”. For this edition the artist chose his “Suiseki No: 1” (essentially an altered marble Scholar Rock) to be cast in bronze, it is intentional that viewers find their own meaning in the work, be it damaged Western antiquity or through pareidolia.

A second round of McClelland editions by Ronnie van Hout, Lisa Waup, Dominic White and Beverly Meldrum are being produced to be available before the end of the year to complement the full offering.

The works are now officially launched and available by contacting Jacqui Harris, Front of House at McClelland Sculpture Park+Gallery by email jharris@mcclellandgallery.com or by phone +61 3 97891671

The McClelland Editions are supported by Creative Victoria through the Strategic Investment Fund 2.


Clive Murray-White, Assisted Suiseki 2021, patinated bronze, steel, timber, 22.5 x 13.5 x 13.5 cm. Copyright the artist. Photo Mitch Pelns-Ross.

 


Manon Van Kouswijk, Beads for Buildings 2021, aluminium, sterling silver, beads, automotive paint, steel pins, 28.0 x 23.0 x 6.0 cm. Copyright the artist. Photo Mitch Pelns-Ross.

 


Narelle White, Gentle Kin 2021, sand, clay, rock, 24.0 x 34.0 cm. Copyright the artist. Photo Mitch Pelns-Ross.

 


Vipoo Srivilasa, Little People 2021, polished bronze, two works: (left) 15.0 x 13.0 x 7.0 cm; (right) 16.0 x 24.0 x 7.0 cm. Copyright the artist. Image courtesy the artist.

McClelland exhibition shortlisted for IDEAS Award

 


Image: Site & Sound: Sonic art as ecological practice 2021, Installation view, McClelland Sculpture Park+Gallery, Photo Christian Capurro.

SITE & SOUND, the immersive sound exhibition held at McClelland last year, has been shortlisted for the prestigious Interior Design Excellence (IDEA) Awards sponsored by inside magazine, the premier professional journal for Australian interior architects and designers.

Thursday 19 October, 2021

SITE & SOUND: Sonic art as ecological practice, 2 December 2020 – 11 April 2021 exhibition invited audiences at McClelland to consider the importance of listening as a means towards a better understanding of the urgent and complex environmental issues facing our planet.

The exhibition drew from RMIT’s Sonic Arts Collection, Australia’s first dedicated collection in this field, augmented by four significant new sound commissions. It featured immersive sound environments, a rich array of performances and listening events, and explorations of the history, theory and significance of field recording and sonic art which evolved over time to provide new experiences for each repeat visit.

Curated by Jon Buckingham, Lawrence Harvey, and Simon Lawrie, SITE & SOUND surveyed diverse practices to reveal the connections between deep listening, field recording, acoustic ecology, natural science, and spatialised sound in contemporary art.  The exhibition design was devised and led by Ross McCleod and SIAL Sound Studios from RMIT.

The Australian design industry’s Interior Design Excellence (IDEA) Awards celebrate the work of established and still-emerging designers as well as promoting the best of Australian design to an international audience.

 

SITE & SOUND has been recognised by the judges as an immersive experience in which the audience could inhabit sound recordings of landscapes from around the world. The complex speaker system was housed in a ‘forest’ of sculptural elements that were arranged to offer dynamic spatial compositions as the visitor moved through the sonic field. The project’s scope included a very modest budget, and short window of time for construction. Flexibility was required for this design, as the sonic artworks for the exhibition were in multiple audio formats and the final speaker locations needed to be resolved in the space, which wasn’t accessible for the six months prior to exhibition.

The judging panel comprised architectural and design luminaries Brahman Perera, Chelsea Hing, David Flack, Domino Risch, Jean-Paul Ghougassian, Meryl Hare, Ryan Genesin, and Bonnie Herring. Award winners and commendations will be announced in November 2021.

 

Freeway sculpture installed in Melbourne’s west

 

Jon Campbell, Backyard, 2021

Wednesday 25 August, 2021

Melbourne’s public art scene has a stunning addition, with a new sculpture installed alongside the Princes Freeway in Werribee.

Backyard, by local artist Jon Campbell, represents a stylised pop version of Campbell’s childhood backyard in the western suburb of Altona.

Described as a linear, multi-coloured design, like a billboard floating in space, Backyard invites viewers to reflect on their own environment and the spaces they inhabit.

It serves as a visual reminder of the $1.8 billion Western Roads Upgrade project – the biggest single investment in Melbourne’s suburban road network, which has delivered eight priority upgrades including three new bridges over the freeway, road widenings, intersection upgrades, 30 kilometres of duplicated lanes and major road rehabilitation works.

Backyard was the result of an independent commission selection process run by one of Australia’s leading sculpture authorities, Melbourne-based McClelland Sculpture Park+Gallery, which also manages the Southern Way sculpture commissions on Peninsula Link.

An independent selection advisory panel reviewed more than 70 submissions – many from local artists – before making its recommendations to Netflow.

The selection advisory panel comprised

McClelland Director Lisa Byrne congratulated Jon on his work, saying the sculpture will inform and enliven the experience of road users travelling between Melbourne and Geelong.

“Public art has become a highly-visible and memorable component of major projects,” Ms Byrne said.

Backyard echoes aspects of everyday life including sport and family, linking them to contemporary culture and history through design, colour, sculpture and storytelling. It embodies high aesthetic aspiration and constitutes a significant artistic statement for Melbourne’s western suburbs, and Australian sculpture more broadly.”

Artist Jon Campbell said the sculpture relates to commercial freeway billboards with its scale and composition.

“I’ve always liked the social aspect backyards bring to our lives,” Mr Campbell said.

“The backyard was a site of influential activity in my upbringing, playing cricket, family barbecues and birthdays. It was a space in which to dream and allowed me as a youngster to imagine hitting the winning runs or kicking the winning goal.

“There is a myth attached to the backyard and a strong desire to have one. Maybe the backyard is not everyone’s dream, but as a space for connection, contemplation and shared activity it remains a desirable and aspirational goal of suburban Melbourne.”

Netflow CEO Pedro Uzquiza said the art highlighted the community benefit brought by successful public-private partnerships.

“This art is part of a broader landscaping and urban design approach that has provided quality and sustainable public amenity and design across the project,” Mr Uzquiza said.

“In addition to Netflow’s support of key non-profit community organisations for 23 years, it is a highly visible reminder of the significant and long-term investment being made in the west and demonstrates the value that can be achieved through public-private partnerships.”